January 15, 2021No Comments

RGP – Branding That Says More

Branding is Important

Branding is a key element of your business. Your branding is the first building block that positions your business to be able to speak to customers and clients about the identity of your company. A strong brand will express your purpose, products, services, and mission to the consumers. Therefore, do not discount the message that your brand is sending out. 

RGP - Regional Growth Partnership

RGP - Regional Growth Partnership of Northwest, Ohio is an economic development group. They prioritize confidentiality, innovation, and time-sensitivity when working with any business. RGP acts in the best interest of businesses and understands the importance of business growth. Most importantly, RGP offers a variety of business development services that effectively manage site selection. These services include:  

  • Comprehensive site and facility searches
  • Incentive packaging
  • Project development, planning, and expediting
  • Facilitating projects in collaboration with regional and state partners
  • Provide access to Northwest Ohio’s premier venture capital firm

RGP is a well known business development company that the team here at Digital 55 has done work for including their branding. 

The why behind the brand.

Sam Scherf, Creative Director said, "Our goal behind the branding of RGP was to focus on the logo and the messaging behind it. The goal for the logo was to create a concise, short, and simple refresh of the image. There is purpose and meaning behind every element of a logo ranging from the color to the font."

Each element of the logo we created fit the criteria of intentional and purposeful. The acronym created a more concise and recognizable look. The organization was most widely known as RGP and the design is clean. The bold lettering allows the logo to capture the attention of potential clients. Due to RGP being a business development company the arrow was included to symbolize growth. The descriptor at the bottom of the logo is a location identifier and tells what RGP is selling. The color choices in the logo are intentional as well. The navy blue represents strength, stability, and confidence. The green accent color represents profit, success, and growth. The colors and meaning complement each other well. Font in the process of designing a logo is important. The font chosen for RGP’s logo is strong, modern, and uncomplicated. The Italicized font represents forward thinking and always being in motion.  Breaking down the RGP logo shows the intentionality and thought that needs to be put into any branding. The branding of a company is the first impression that potential customers and clients receive.

We are thankful that RGP allowed us to be on this journey with them and that we continue to get to have this company as a client. You can find RGP here

At Digital 55 we care greatly about our clients and are always ready to help. We will intentionally develop your brand and create the right first impression for you. Contact us here today!  [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

January 15, 2021No Comments

Design Trends We’re Leaving Behind in 2020

Another Year, Another Set of Trends...Yikes. Every year I wait for new, upcoming, and fresh design trends to appear. Then, within a matter of months the once new trend, becomes tired and overused. They get used for decades to come until they have been overdone beyond belief. Every designer should be aware of trends, but needs to understand when and where to use them. The Finesse of a Positive Online Presence. Every year I wait for new, upcoming, and fresh designs to appear. Then, within a matter of months the once new trend becomes tired and beat to death. They get used for decades to come until they have been overdone beyond belief. Every designer should be aware of trends, but needs to understand when and where to use them. If I See Another Glitch Effect Just “Because”, I’m Out. Being in the design world for 5 years, I have seen certain trends that have been around for a long time, and some that are just beginning. Here are some examples of trends that truly have been beat to death during the past year. Stock Images? Trust me, I love a good stock photo, but does it tell anything about your company? If not, let’s take a genuine picture of people in your office instead. Overcomplicated Designs. After 2020, no one is looking for a design that requires a lot of thought, or the message isn’t remotely clear. Utilizing clean and minimalist design to show your viewer the message instantly.

  • Utilize large bold headlines
  • Take time to mow over verbiage to make sure it’s crystal clear.
  • Less design elements “just because it’s pretty.”
  • Focus on the message to the viewer.

[/uncode_list][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image media="90328" media_width_percent="100"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_height_percent="50" overlay_alpha="50" gutter_size="4" column_width_percent="100" shift_y="0" z_index="0" el_class="inverted-device-order"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image media="90329" media_width_percent="100" media_ratio="four-three"][/vc_column][vc_column column_width_use_pixel="yes" position_vertical="middle" gutter_size="3" overlay_alpha="50" shift_x="0" shift_y="0" shift_y_down="0" z_index="0" medium_width="0" mobile_width="0" width="1/2" column_width_pixel="900"][vc_custom_heading heading_semantic="h3" text_size="h3" text_weight="700"]Collage Done Incorrectly[/vc_custom_heading][vc_column_text]Unless you’re a rock band from the 70’s. I will test the reasoning of the collage effect. It is a phenomenal way to create a rugged and edgy effect for the viewer, but does it really need to make your brand stand out?[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_height_percent="50" overlay_alpha="50" gutter_size="4" column_width_percent="100" shift_y="0" z_index="0" el_class="inverted-device-order"][vc_column column_width_use_pixel="yes" position_vertical="middle" gutter_size="3" overlay_alpha="50" shift_x="0" shift_y="0" shift_y_down="0" z_index="0" medium_width="0" mobile_width="0" width="1/2" column_width_pixel="900"][vc_custom_heading heading_semantic="h3" text_size="h3" text_weight="700"]Glitch Effect[/vc_custom_heading][vc_column_text]For the sake of designing with a purpose, please use a glitch effect ONLY if you’re a gamer that wants to spice things up.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image media="90330" media_width_percent="100"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_height_percent="50" overlay_alpha="50" gutter_size="4" column_width_percent="100" shift_y="0" z_index="0" el_class="inverted-device-order"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image media="90331" media_width_percent="100"][/vc_column][vc_column column_width_use_pixel="yes" position_vertical="middle" gutter_size="3" overlay_alpha="50" shift_x="0" shift_y="0" shift_y_down="0" z_index="0" medium_width="0" mobile_width="0" width="1/2" column_width_pixel="900"][vc_custom_heading heading_semantic="h3" text_size="h3" text_weight="700"]Mismatched Typography[/vc_custom_heading][vc_column_text]Paula Scher was the mastermind behind the Public branding. She created the logo with descending weights of fonts to evoke the feeling of the “bring in da noise, bring in da funk” show that was playing at the time. This was loud and evocative. Type mismatching needs to show purpose with why the type is the way it is.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]