Another Year, Another Set of Trends...Yikes. Every year I wait for new, upcoming, and fresh design trends to appear. Then, within a matter of months the once new trend, becomes tired and overused. They get used for decades to come until they have been overdone beyond belief. Every designer should be aware of trends, but needs to understand when and where to use them. The Finesse of a Positive Online Presence. Every year I wait for new, upcoming, and fresh designs to appear. Then, within a matter of months the once new trend becomes tired and beat to death. They get used for decades to come until they have been overdone beyond belief. Every designer should be aware of trends, but needs to understand when and where to use them. If I See Another Glitch Effect Just “Because”, I’m Out. Being in the design world for 5 years, I have seen certain trends that have been around for a long time, and some that are just beginning. Here are some examples of trends that truly have been beat to death during the past year. Stock Images? Trust me, I love a good stock photo, but does it tell anything about your company? If not, let’s take a genuine picture of people in your office instead. Overcomplicated Designs. After 2020, no one is looking for a design that requires a lot of thought, or the message isn’t remotely clear. Utilizing clean and minimalist design to show your viewer the message instantly.

  • Utilize large bold headlines
  • Take time to mow over verbiage to make sure it’s crystal clear.
  • Less design elements “just because it’s pretty.”
  • Focus on the message to the viewer.

Collage Done Incorrectly: Unless you’re a rock band from the 70’s. I will test the reasoning of the collage effect. It is a phenomenal way to create a rugged and edgy effect for the viewer, but does it really need to make your brand stand out?

Glitch Effect: For the sake of designing with a purpose, please use a glitch effect ONLY if you’re a gamer that wants to spice things up.

Mismatched Typography: Paula Scher was the mastermind behind the Public branding. She created the logo with descending weights of fonts to evoke the feeling of the “bring in da noise, bring in da funk” show that was playing at the time. This was loud and evocative. Type mismatching needs to show purpose with why the type is the way it is.